CHAOSScon North America 2021

Co-located with Open Source Summit North America

Seattle, USA

September 30th, 2021

About CHAOSScon

Learn about open source project health metrics and tools used by open source projects, communities, and engineering teams to track and analyze their community work. This conference will provide a venue for discussing open source project health, CHAOSS updates, use cases, and hands-on workshops for developers, community managers, project managers, and anyone interested in measuring open source project health. We will also share insights from the CHAOSS working groups on Diversity and Inclusion, Evolution, Risk, Value, and Common Metrics.

Where

Hyatt Regency Seattle
808 Howell St
Seattle, WA 98101

Phone: 1-206-973-1234

Room: 301 - Ashnola

When

September 30, 2021
9am to 12:30pm (PDT)

Live Streaming

Live streaming of CHAOSScon will be available on our YouTube Channel. No registration needed for the live stream.

Registration

Registration for the inperson CHAOSScon event is part of the Open Source Summit!

Register Now!

Event Details

Code of Conduct at Event

All speakers and attendees are required to adhere to our Event Code of Conduct. If you have any concerns regarding code of conduct issues prior to the event or during the event, please contact Elizabeth Barron or Georg Link.

Instances of abusive, harassing, or otherwise unacceptable behavior may be reported by contacting the CHAOSS Code of Conduct Team at chaoss-inclusion@lists.linuxfoundation.org.

For Emergency Services at the event, please dial (911)

Social Media and Conference Updates

Subscribe to our Slack Channel #CHAOSScon for updates about the conference and to coordinate meetups.

Follow @CHAOSSproj and tweet #CHAOSS #CHAOSScon during the Summit and CHAOSScon to let everyone know how important open source community health is!

Schedule

September 30, 2021 9:00 am to 12:30 pm Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)

Time Sessions Slides
8:00 - 9:00 [In-Person] Networking Meetup (Hallway Track)
Grab a coffee and join us before the conference begins
9:00 - 9:10 [In-Person] Welcome & State of CHAOSS
Georg Link
PDF
9:10 - 9:40 [Remote/Live] KEYNOTE
All of the People, All of the Time: A holistic approach to building empowered open source culture in your organization

Emma Irwin
9:40 - 9:45 Break
9:45 - 10:05 [In-Person] Why we join and why we leave open source communities
Kevin Lumbard & Elizabeth Barron
PDF
10:05 - 10:25 [Recorded]Characterizing and detecting incivility in open source code review discussions
Isabella Ferreira
PDF
10:25 - 10:55 [In-Person] Mystic - An initial effort in academic metrics, impact, and community
Stephen Jacobs & Emi Simpson
PDF
10:55 [In-Person] Group Photo with Conference Participants
10:55 - 11:15 Break
11:15 - 11:40 [In-Person] Lightning Talks
Signup available the day of the conference
11:40 - 12:00 [Recorded] Building metrics models based on the state of the art best practices
Xiaoya Xia & King Gao
PDF
12:00 - 12:10 [In-Person] A complex web of open source software dependencies risk
Sean Goggins
PDF
12:10 - 12:20 [Recorded] CHAOSS DEI Badging: From there to here
Anita Ihuman
PDF
12:20 - 12:30 [In-Person] Closing Remarks
Georg Link
TBD [In-Person] CHAOSS Networking Event
Subscribe to the #CHAOSScon Slack Channel for news about CHAOSS meetups in Seattle

Speakers and Session Descriptions

Georg Link

Georg LinkDirector of Sales - Bitergia
@GeorgLink

Welcome & Closing Remarks

Emma Irwin

Emma IrwinSenior Program Manager in Microsoft's Open Source Programs Office (OSPO)
@sunnydeveloper

"During a successful career as a software developer, Emma discovered open source and was inspired by the potential of developing software collaboratively - especially the opportunity to connect with others around shared purpose. This led to contribution and participation in many projects over the years including Drupal, MySQL and Mozilla - she even maintained a few of her own small projects.

Emma brought her passion for technology and people into her role as an open source strategist at Mozilla where she spent seven years focused on empowering product teams, and their contributors. She's most proud of her of her work developing the first-ever diversity, equity, and inclusion strategy for open source communities, and contributing this work to the CHAOSS D&I working group. Emma now brings that same passion for people and open source to her role as a PM Microsoft's Open Source Programs Office (OSPO). She can't believe her good fortune to be working with Stormy Peters and the rest of the talented OSPO team and hopes this isn't just a dream!"

Keynote: All of the People, All of the Time: A holistic approach to building empowered open source culture in your organization As an ecosystem, open source has been making vast improvements in how we think about and design for community and contributor success. What's lacking is an investment, and common language needed to build healthy open source culture inside organizations; the success of which can have direct and lasting impact in communities, and the products we're working on together. In this talk, Emma will share how she evaluates and designs for a healthy, and inclusive open source culture within Microsoft using building blocks of empowerment, purpose, trust and belonging.


Kevin Lumbard

Kevin LumbardDoctoral Student Researcher - University of Nebraska at Omaha
@Paper_Monkeys

Kevin is a doctoral candidate at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. His concentration is on Human-Centered Computing (HCC) and Project Management. His research focus is on design and community health metrics in the context of corporate-communal open source projects and open agriculture projects. He is a charter member and maintainer for the CHAOSS project.

Session: Why we join and why we leave open source communities This talk will present the preliminary results from 40 interviews with corporate open source contributors. We asked them "what project characteristics do they look at when making decisions about joining an open source community" and "what project characteristics may influence their decision to leave a community".


Elizabeth Barron

Elizabeth BarronCHAOSS Community Manager
@ElizabethN

Elizabeth has spent 20+ years in open source, with the bulk of her career in community management. She currently works as the Community Manager for CHAOSS, and previously was in community management at GitHub, Pivotal/VMWare, Engine Yard and Sourceforge. She is also a professional nature and botanical photographer. Elizabeth lives in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Session: Why we join and why we leave open source communities This talk will present the preliminary results from 40 interviews with corporate open source contributors. We asked them "what project characteristics do they look at when making decisions about joining an open source community" and "what project characteristics may influence their decision to leave a community".


Isabella Ferreira

Isabella FerreiraPhD Candidate in Computer Engineering, Polytechnique Montréal
@isaferreira_57

Isabella Ferreira is currently a PhD candidate at Polytechnique Montréal working under the direction of Dr. Jinghui Cheng and Dr. Bram Adams. Her research focuses on investigating (in)civility in Free/Libre and Open Source Software (FLOSS) communities. Her main research interests are mining software repositories, affective computing, and software maintenance and evolution.

Session: Characterizing and Detecting Incivility in Open Source Code Review Discussions Code review is an important quality assurance activity for open source software development. Yet, code review discussions among developers and maintainers can be heated and sometimes involve personal attacks and unnecessary disrespectful comments, demonstrating, therefore, incivility. Although incivility in public discussions has received increasing attention from researchers in different domains, the understanding of this phenomenon is still very limited in the context of software development and, more specifically, code review. To address this gap, this proposed talk will present the results of a qualitative analysis conducted on 1,545 emails from the Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML) that were associated with rejected changes. From this analysis, we identified the features of discussion of civil and uncivil communication as well as the causes and consequences of uncivil communication. Based on our results and with the goal to create healthier and more attractive open source communities, we will also discuss in this talk (i) approaches that could be used to address incivility before and after it happens, (ii) pitfalls to avoid when trying to automatically detect incivility, and (iii) heuristics for detecting incivility in code review discussions.


Stephen Jacobs

Stephen JacobsDirector, Open@RIT, Rochester Institute of Technology

Stephen Jacobs is the director of Open@RIT, a research center and the OSPO for the Rochester Institute of Technology. He serves on the steering committee of the TODO Group, is a member of the CHAOSS Value working group and was a pre-board organizer of the recently announced O3D Foundation. Jacobs has been teaching RIT classes in Open Source for thirteen years and led the development of RIT’s academic minor in “Free and Open Source Software and Free Culture” the first of it’s kind in the country and the culminating piece in RIT’s FOSS across the curriculum offerings at the university.

Session: Mystic - An initial effort in academic metrics, impact and community The last few years have seen a significant uptick in interest in the concept of Open Source Program Offices in academic and governmental entities. Last year the EU adopted an Open Source Strategy for 2020-2023. This year, the United States, The National Academies for Science, Engineering and Mathematics, has called for presidents and provosts of colleges and universities to significantly increase support for Open Work across all colleges and universities in the US. This panel will start with members of the OSPO++ working group (that meets regularly to encourage the creation of municipal and academic OSPOs) will briefly introduce attendees to the needs of these developer and user communities. It will then move to a demo of Mystic, and Open@RIT effort to use GrimoireLab to collect data and display data on faculty Open Work contributions. Questions for all panelists will be encouraged in the last ten minutes.


Emi Simpson

Emi SimpsonDirector, Open@RIT, Rochester Institute of Technology

Emi (any pronouns except she/her) is a full-stack developer for Open@RIT, and the lead developer for the open source community health metrics dashboard, Mystic. Although xe's done work all over the open source community, Emi holds a particular interest in decentralized open source projects, ethical source, and of course, the art of building inclusive and healthy open source communities and ecosystems.

Session: Mystic - An initial effort in academic metrics, impact and community The last few years have seen a significant uptick in interest in the concept of Open Source Program Offices in academic and governmental entities. Last year the EU adopted an Open Source Strategy for 2020-2023. This year, the United States, The National Academies for Science, Engineering and Mathematics, has called for presidents and provosts of colleges and universities to significantly increase support for Open Work across all colleges and universities in the US. This panel will start with members of the OSPO++ working group (that meets regularly to encourage the creation of municipal and academic OSPOs) will briefly introduce attendees to the needs of these developer and user communities. It will then move to a demo of Mystic, and Open@RIT effort to use GrimoireLab to collect data and display data on faculty Open Work contributions. Questions for all panelists will be encouraged in the last ten minutes.


Xiaoya Xia

Xiaoya XiaMaster Degree Student, East China Normal University

Xiaoya is a postgraduate student at East China Normal University. Her major is software engineering. She has two years of experience in open source, and one of the research topics is data-driven open source collaboration and community governance. She became a technical writer of CHAOSS D&I Badging project in 2020, then participated in growing the CHAOSS community in Asia Pacific region.

Session: Building Metrics Models Based on the State of the Art Best Practices The purpose of defining metrics is to continuously improve the workflow, empower open source projects with the capabilities of governance, operation, and development. We looked into some best practices of the benchmarking communities in the industry on how they measure and govern the project, and constantly explored which metrics and factors will affect the results of measurements. This talk will further seek connections among the current metrics and build a set of models, not only to address existing problems in communities, but also to predict the direction of future community development.


King Gao

King GaoTechnical Expert --- Huawei 2012 Laboratory

King Gao is an engineer from Huawei Technologies Co.,Ltd and has 6 years of experience in open source governance. His focus is on compliance and operations in open source communities. He founded CHAOSS' Asia-Pacific meeting and organized CHAOSS's first China meetup. CHAOSS is the first community in his life, and he is very glad to participate in CHAOSS. King is also a board member in the OpenChain project under the Linux foundation.

Session: Building Metrics Models Based on the State of the Art Best Practices The purpose of defining metrics is to continuously improve the workflow, empower open source projects with the capabilities of governance, operation, and development. We looked into some best practices of the benchmarking communities in the industry on how they measure and govern the project, and constantly explored which metrics and factors will affect the results of measurements. This talk will further seek connections among the current metrics and build a set of models, not only to address existing problems in communities, but also to predict the direction of future community development.


Sean Goggins

Sean GogginsAssociate Professor - University of Missouri
@sociallycompute

Sean is an open source software researcher and a founding member of the Linux Foundation’s working group on community health analytics for open source software CHAOSS, co-lead of the CHAOSS metrics software working group and leader of the open source metrics tool AUGUR which can be forked and cloned and experimented wtih on GitHub. After a decade as a software engineer, Sean decided his calling was in research. His open source research is framed around a broader agenda of social computing research, which he pursues as an associate professor of computer science at the University of Missouri.

Sean is also the founder of the Data Science and Analytics Masters program at Missouri, which he’s now passed on to people who want administrative empire. Sean’s publications focus on understanding how social technologies influence organizational, small group and community dynamics, typically including analysis of electronic trace data from systems combined with the perspectives of people whose behavior is traced. Group Informatics is a methodology and ontology Sean has articulated with the aim of helping build consensus among researchers and developers for how to ethically and systematically make sense of electronic trace data. Structural fluidity, a construct Sean developed with his collaborators Peppo Valetto and Kelly Blincoe, aims to make sense of structural dynamics in virtual software organizations, and how those dynamics affect performance. Working with Josh Introne, Bryan Semaan and Ingrid Erickson, Sean is elaborating on mechanisms for identifying structural fluidity and organizational dynamics in electronic trace data using the lens of complex systems theory. The Authors won ""Best Paper of 2020"" in the Journal for the Association of Information Systems and Technology (JASIS&T) for their work. Sean's other work includes collaborations with Matt Germonprez on the Open Collaboration Data Exchange and Open Source Health metrics projects. He lives in Columbia, MO with his wife Kate, two step daughters and a dog named Huckleberry.

Session: A complex web of open source software dependencies risk Today, software project development is nearly impossible without the use of interdependent components. These interdependencies have such a strong impact that software projects often fail if an open-source project library malfunctions. This was observed in the NPM project, when an open-source project contributor deleted 11 lines of code that he had contributed to an open-source library causing many other projects dependent on this library to fail. This presentation will present a synthesis of the complexity of managing dependencies, and the relationship between open source software dependency metrics, quality assurance, and security. Members of the CHAOSS Risk working group will answer a simple yet a complex question: what are the categories of open source software dependencies, and what metrics can make these risks visible. Participants will gain insights into: 1. What to measure? And 2. How to measure dependency risks? To answer these questions we worked across Linux Foundation projects to identify various dependency issues, and develop a set of metrics based on: 1. Goal 2. Question 3. Metric Approach. The metrics we then implemented using the CHAOSS Project’s Augur software will demonstrate one approach for visualizing and assessing dependency risk across large project portfolios. The key takeaway is it is work measuring the riskiness of a piece of software you're using or dependent on.


Anita Ihuman

Anita IhumanSoftware Developer, CHAOSS
@Anita_ihuman

Anita is a Software Developer, an Author and a Speaker who enjoys sharing information through Public Speaking and Technical Writing. She loves learning, teaching, and engaging with the Open Source communities. She is a reviewer for the CHAOSS Diversity and Inclusion Badging initiative. She is a community manager at Layer5, an organization that represents the largest Service Mesh projects and their maintainers in the world.

Session: CHAOSS DEI Badging - From There to Here The CHAOSS project would like to share our experience developing, and implementing a peer reviewed event badging program. The value of appreciating and acknowledging diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in open source communities is underestimated. It is critical to bring together people with different backgrounds, mindsets, ideas and experiences to work for a common cause. The CHAOSS Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Badging Initiative awards badges to events based on their adherence to and prioritization of DEI best practices. The initiative aims to increase understanding of project and event practices that encourage greater diversity and wider inclusion of people from different backgrounds. This presentation will provide a holistic view of: * The CHAOSS DEI Badging Initiative * Examples of badged events and lessons learned from the process * Ideas on how the badging process may be improved In particular, we will highlight the people, technologies, and processes that have made the CHAOSS DEI Badging Initiative a success to date.

Sponsors

This is a community organized event, and we rely on sponsors to cover costs for coffee and other refreshments. If you are interested in sponsoring, please have a look at our sponsor_prospectus. Thank you to our current sponsors!

 

Silver Level Sponsors

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
Google

Bronze Level Sponsors

Bitergia
Red Hat

CHAOSScon NA 2021 Organizing Committee

  • Daniel Izquierdo
  • Dawn Foster
  • Georg Link
  • Kevin Lumbard
  • Matt Germonprez
  • Ray Paik
  • Sean Goggins
  • Sophia Vargas
  • Elizabeth Barron
  • Matt Cantu
  • Vinod Ahuja

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