CHAOSScon Europe 2020

Brussels, Belgium

January 31st, 2020

About CHAOSScon

Learn about open source project health metrics and tools used by open source projects, communities, and engineering teams to track and analyze their community work. This conference will provide a venue for discussing open source project health, CHAOSS updates, use cases, and hands-on workshops for developers, community managers, project managers, and anyone interested in measuring open source project health. We will also share insights from the CHAOSS working groups on Diversity and Inclusion, Evolution, Risk, Value, and Common Metrics.

Where

Room: EUROPE

Hotel ibis Brussels City Centre
Rue Joseph Plateau N°2, 1000
Bruxelles, Belgium

Phone: +32 2 620 04 26

When

January 31, 2020
9am to 5:50pm

Register Now!

Code of Conduct at Event

All speakers and attendees are required to adhere to our Event Code of Conduct. If you have any concerns regarding code of conduct issues prior to the event or during the event, please contact Dawn Foster or Georg Link.

Instances of abusive, harassing, or otherwise unacceptable behavior may be reported by contacting the CHAOSS Code of Conduct Team at chaoss-inclusion@lists.linuxfoundation.org.

For Emergency Services at the event, please dial 112

Registration

Registration is now open!

This is the first time we are charging a $10 fee for registering to attend CHAOSScon. We'd like to explain. At CHAOSScon NA 2019, interested people were discouraged from coming because they were on a waitlist but we had many empty seats due to no-shows. By charging a small amount, we hope to limit no-shows. The ticket fee will go towards providing coffee, tee, snacks, and serve lunch.

Diversity and Inclusion

To encourage and increase the participation of a diverse community, we are pleased to offer waivers for registration based on diversity or need. To get a your registration waived, please submit a request. For questions, please contact Georg Link.

Anyone may request a waiver for the registration fee.

Call for Participation

The CFP closed November 30, 2019. Thank you to everyone who sumitted.

Schedule: January 31, 2020

Time Sessions
9:00 Registration & Networking
9:30 Keynote: Welcome & State of CHAOSS
Georg Link
9:50 Keynote: Ethics (Title TBA)
Deb Nicholson
10:20 Heat, Light, and Love: Telling Twitter's Open Source Program Office's Story
Sean Goggins & Remy DeCausemaker
10:40 Morning Break
10:50 Measuring Culture
Sharan Foga
11:00 Technical Lag: Measuring the outdatedness, vulnerability and bugginess of software
Tom Mens & Ahmed Zerouali
11:20 CHA-IO-SS - Community Health Analytics for Inner and Open Source Software
Daniel Izquierdo
11:50 Lunch & Networking
13:00 TBA
13:20 TBA
13:40 Meet Cauldron! Your SaaS Software Development Analytics solution
Jose Manrique Lopez de la Fuente
14:00 Navigating Community Health Through Comparison
Kevin Lumbard
14:20 Lightning Talks (5 minutes each)
Metrics and valuation of open source projects: A crossover between Open Source and Open Science
Camille Moulin
Additional Lightning Talk sign-ups during event
14:50 Break
15:20 Language barriers for open source contributors
Isabella Vieira Ferreira
15:40 Metrics are more than the sum of their parts
Matt Broberg
16:00 Application of Health metrics on a Cross-sector software ecosystem
Johan Linåker
16:20 Open and Reproducible Research with Community-driven Research Software Metrics
Yo Yehudi
16:40 Managing community backlog with the help of metrics
Ray Paik & Alberto Pérez García-Plaza
17:00 Diversity & Inclusion Badging Program
Matt Germonprez & Matt Snell
17:20 True Confessions: The Seven Deadly Sins of Open Source Communities
Brian Proffitt
17:50 Adjourn to FOSDEM Beer Event

Speakers and Session Descriptions

Ahmed Zerouali

Ahmed Zerouali

Postdoc in Software Engineering - University of Mons, Belgium

Ahmed finished his PhD in Science in 2019 from the University of Mons. He is currently working within the SECO-ASSIST project (https://secoassist.github.io) as a postdoctoral researcher from the UMONS. His research focuses on the evolution, health and analysis of open source software ecosystems. @a_zerou

Session: Technical Lag: Measuring the outdatedness, vulnerability and bugginess of software

This talk presents a generic and empirically validated measurement framework based on the technical lag concept. The framework can be used to assess and reduce the outdatedness, vulnerability and bugginess of software deployments, software projects, software containers and reusable software libraries. We argue that such a metric is very relevant for assessing the health of software (eco)systems, and should become part of the CHAOSS metrics portfolio and tooling. The concept of technical lag aims to quantify to which extent a deployed collection of components is outdated with respect to an ideal deployment. How to interpret this ""ideal"" and the ""outdatedness"" w.r.t. this ""ideal"" is highly context-specific. Depending on the needs and goals of a specific project or a maintainer, the focus may be on functionality, security, stability or even other factors. The ""components"" under consideration could be individual software packages, third-party libraries, component dependencies, or software containers bundling collections of components. To cover this high variability, we have come up with a generic framework for technical lag. We have operationalised and empirically validated this framework in different contexts: to assess the technical lag incurred by outdated dependencies in reusable package repositories such as npm; and to quantify the outdatedness of Debian-based Docker containers in terms of missing updates, vulnerabilities and bugs. We also report on the qualitative evaluation of the usefulness of measuring technical lag, through online surveys conducted with open source software developers. Finally, we present Conpan, an open source tool that we have developed for analysing technical lag in Docker containers. Useful references about technical lag are available on https://secoassist.github.io/results.html


Brian Proffitt

Brian Proffitt

Sr. Principal Community Architect - Red Hat

Brian is a Senior Principal Community Architect for the Red Hat Open Source Program Office, responsible for community content, onboarding, and open source consulting. Brian also serves on the governing board for Project CHAOSS, a metrics-oriented approach to ascertaining community health. A former technology journalist, Brian is also a graduate lecturer at the University of Notre Dame. Follow him on Twitter @TheTechScribe.

Session: True Confessions: The Seven Deadly Sins of Open Source Communities

This talk would take a humorous approach to explaining what really no one should do when managing and measuring open source community best practices, with the primary goal of instilling positive open source development practices to the audience. Such ""don'ts"" include not documenting anything, establishing no clear paths to success, and not bothering to communicate.


Camille Moulin

Camille Moulin

Consultant - Inno³

Camille has been an Open Source and Open Standards advocate for quite a few years now; he is currently working as a consultant at Inno³, a French niche consultancy specialized in all things Open from an IP & organisational point of view. @Camille

Session: Metrics and valuation of open source projects: A crossover between Open Source and Open Science

Despite the evolution of the legal context (at European and national levels) to acknowledge and leverage the benefits of Open Source, Open Data and Open Science - especially in regards to innovation - the most commonly used metrics to evaluate the potential and the success of projects are still tied to old & closed Intellectual Property practices (number of patents, direct financial streams from proprietary licencing, etc.). There is a need for metrics more suited to fairly arbitrate between an open or a closed model and also to more efficiently manage open projects’ valorisation. This session will present our explorations for a methodology to reflect the value generated by Open Source projects in the field of public research. We will build on our work in an open working group dedicated to the valuation of open intangible assets and studies we have conducted for public institutions, including the French Space Agency (CNES). It will cover theoretical questions like the definition of value in a given context as well as down-to-earth implementation-specific problems, like choosing micro-metrics for code contribution. The presentation will also highlight how current research in academia on the evaluation of open science (good citation practices, tracability and reproducibility) can be a source of inspiration for further work in open source communities.


Daniel Izquierdo

Daniel Izquierdo

Director of Consulting - Bitergia

Daniel Izquierdo Cortazar is a cofounder at Bitergia, a company that provides software analytics for open source and internal ecosystems, where he’s focused on the quality of the data, research of new metrics, analysis, and studies of interest for Bitergia customers via data mining and processing. Daniel holds a PhD in free software engineering from the Universidad Rey Juan Carlos in Madrid, where his research focused on the analysis of buggy developer activity patterns in the Mozilla community. @dizquierdo

Session: CHA-IO-SS - Community Health Analytics for Inner and Open Source Software

CHAOSS has been on the ground for the last couple of years with a strong focus on open source. Indeed at the very beginning there was some discussion to have included in the mission and vision of the community the term InnerSource that was lately removed. What if we think for a while about InnerSource in the terms of metrics? As active member of the InnerSource Commons, it is worth mentioning a list of them and how behaviours that are assumed by default in open source communities (collaboration, transparency, communication) do not even exist at the InnerSource level. This talk aims at fostering some discussion internally at CHAOSS with the purpose of understanding InnerSource requirements and how with the same infrastructure, metrics and discussions we're having, CHAOSS may become at some point some standard in the industry about software development metrics (and not only open source software development metrics).


Georg Link

Georg Link

Director of Sales - Bitergia

Georg Link is an Open Source Community Strategist. Georg co-founded the Linux Foundation CHAOSS Project to advance analytics and metrics for open source project health. Georg has 13 years experience as an active contributor to several open source projects and has presented on open source topics at 18 conferences. Georg has an MBA and a Ph.D. in Information Technology. In his spare time, Georg enjoys reading fiction and hot-air ballooning. @GeorgLink

Keynote: Welcome & State of CHAOSS


Isabella Vieira Ferreira

Isabella Vieira Ferreira

PhD Student - Polytechnique Montréal

Isabella Ferreira is currently a PhD student at Polytechnique Montréal working under the supervision of Dr. Bram Adams. As part of her degree, she is working with cross-cultural contributions in open source projects, civil communication in open source projects, and on how to link review e-mails to Git commits. Her main research interests are mining software repositories, software maintenance and evolution, and human affect in Software Engineering. @isaferreira_57

Session: Language barriers for open source contributors

While open source development is common across the world, projects from countries outside North America and Europe, such as China, have difficulties attracting international contributors. One major reason for this is language differences. Thus, there is a lack of understanding of whether there are problems with attraction and retention of contributors due to language differences. To address the aforementioned issue, the proposed presentation will provide an overview of the diversity of non-native English speakers in different open source ecosystems. Furthermore, we will provide results about whether or not those contributors face a language barrier when contributing to open source projects. This will include a survey and a discussion with the audience to understand their motivations when contributing to open source projects, if they have ever faced any communication problems due to language differences, if the non-native English speakers feel welcomed in open source communities, and if they have ever felt that there is a language barrier when contributing to open source projects. The presentation will conclude with a discussion on how we can create metrics to assess the spoken language diversity in open source communities and how to include those people in the community more easily.


Johan Linåker

Johan Linåker

Postdoctoral Researcher - Lund University

Johan is a postdoctoral researcher focusing on how the public sector can create platforms with open data and software on which ecosystems of actors can innovate through cross-sector collaborations. In his Ph.D., he focused specifically on helping companies make contributions and engage with communities in alignment with business goals. He sits on the advisory board for Hack for Sweden, the Swedish governments gov-tech initiative for enabling open and data-driven innovation. He is also the founder of OpenHack, a non-profit tech-community solving real-world challenges connected to the global goals in Agenda 2030. @johanlinaker

Session: Application of Health metrics on a Cross-sector software ecosystem

Business and software ecosystem health can be considered as a key performance indicator of an ecosystem's potential to create opportunities for its members.

In this talk Johan will present the practical application of ecosystem health on JobTech Dev, a software ecosystem of job-matching actors in Sweden. The ecosystem is lead by the Swedish Public Employment Service and is underpinned by open data and open source software that is used and co-developed by the whole ecosystem.

Elicited metrics cover the ecosystem's productivity in development and maintenance, robustness to withstand change and disruptions, and openness for new business applications, use cases and external contributions.

As the metrics has just been introduced at the Employment Service, Johan will share some initial lessons learned and discuss the roadmap of connecting the health metrics to impact metrics relating to the ecosystem's common vision of improved job-matching on the Swedish labor market.


Jose Manrique Lopez de la Fuente

Jose Manrique Lopez de la Fuente

CEO - Bitergia

Manrique is the CEO and shareholder in Bitergia and a free, libre, open source software development communities passionate. He is a graduate Industrial Engineer with research and development experience from the Technological Center for Computer Science and Communications of the Principality of Asturias (CTIC), W3C working groups, Ándago Engineering, and Continua Health Alliance. Former executive director of the Spanish Open Source Enterprises Association (ASOLIF), and expert consultant for the Spanish National Open Source Reference Center (CENATIC).

Involved in several communities related to free, libre, open source software he is currently active in GrimoireLab and CHAOSS(Community Health Analytics for Open Source Software). He has been recognized as AWS Data Hero and GitLab Community Hero.

You can reach him on Twitter as @jsmanrique, and when he is not online he loves to spend time with his family and surfing.

Session: Meet Cauldron! Your SaaS Software Development Analytics solution Cauldron is a brand-new free **open source SaaS** able to analyze software development community and processes. It relies on [CHAOSS GrimoireLab](https://chaoss.github.io/grimoirelab) to collect and process data from different tools used in software development such as git, GitLab, GitHub and/or social platforms like Meetup, and [**Open Distro for ElasticSearch**](https://opendistro.github.io/for-elasticsearch/) to store and to display the project data.The talk shows how Cauldron can be easily put into action to analyze the software projects that matter to the attendees, and to get some CHAOSS metrics about them.

Kevin Lumbard

Kevin Lumbard

Doctoral Student Researcher - University of Nebraska at Omaha

Kevin is a doctoral student at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Kevin is an active participant in the CHAOSS community. His research is concerned with collaborative design and community health metrics. @Paper_Monkeys

Session: Navigating Community Health Through Comparison

In this presentation, we share stories from 30 plus interviews on community health and offer our insights from engagement with the CHAOSS project. In particular, we focus on how people use comparisons in the determination of project health. To make solutions actionable, placing open source project metrics into the specific contexts where they are consumed is critical. When open source project contributors compare one open source project to another, they get a sense of how they are doing, relatively speaking. The comparison is social insofar as people draw comparisons between projects that are similar in terms of personnel or other key characteristics; projects they are socially familiar with. Through comparison, open source project contributors identify metrics that draw essential contrasts, and through these contrasts evaluate the likelihood of continued success or failure for their projects of interest.


Matt Broberg

Matt Broberg

Technical Advocate & Editor - Opensource.com

Matt is an advocate for open source software and currently the Technical Editor of Opensource.com. He specializes in designing technology communities that develop products and content in a way that tells a powerful story.

Matt was an EMC storage expert, VMware vExpert, and former fan of other proprietary technologies. He now focuses on open source and DevRel adoption. He is a serial podcaster, best known for the Geek Whisperers podcast, co-built the DevRel Collective, and often shares on Twitter and GitHub @mbbroberg. He’s also a fan of tattoos and cats, though he remains unsure of Schrödinger’s. @mbbroberg

Session: Metrics are more than the sum of their parts

There was a time in human history when it was believed that all of human behavior could be explained with math. That widely acclaimed and highly respected science was disproved by an “incompleteness theorem” that showed math cannot explain the world on its own. In another time in human history, psychologists believed all human behavior could be reduced to cause and effect. This gave rise to Gestalt theory that shows perception is not always mapped cleanly or with certainty. We are in a state of Community building that maps success to metrics like lines of code and GitHub stars. I would like us to explore where these metrics fall short on capturing the most significant value of a community, and how we can use other metrics to begin to show the much larger impact Community organizations like Developer Relations (DevRel) can have on a business. This improved process begins with mapping value to business need, pairing it with a community need, and back to the business opportunities. If you enjoy a little science, a lot of community metrics, and are looking for new ways to show a business the value of your community efforts, this talk is for you. There will be practical advice on how to pitch and position Community whether you’re a Community Manager, Developer Advocate, or other Developer Relations professional.


Matt Germonprez

Matt Germonprez

Professor - University of Nebraska at Omaha

Matt Germonprez is the Mutual of Omaha Professor of Information Systems in the College of Information Science & Technology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. He uses qualitative field-studies to research corporate engagement with open communities and the dynamics of design in these engagements. His lines of research have been funded by numerous organizations including the National Science Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and Mozilla. Matt is the co-founder of the Linux Foundation Community Health Analytics OSS Project (CHAOSS). He has had work accepted at ISR, MISQ, JAIS, JIT, ISJ, I&O, CSCW, OpenSym, Group, HICSS, IEEE Computer, and ACM Interactions. Matt is an active open source community member, having presented design and development work at LinuxCon, the Open Source Summit North America, the Linux Foundation Open Compliance Summit, the Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit, and the Open Source Leadership Summit. @germ

Session: Diversity & Inclusion Badging Program

The Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that employees in the field of “computer and mathematical occupations” are 25.6% female (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2019). A lack of D&I is not only a known problem but also acts as a barrier for potential contributors becoming involved with IT as a lack of D&I will perpetuate complacency (Irwin, 2018), avoidance (Sterling, 2016), and a negative collective conscience (Blincoe et al., 2019). Within IT, open source software exhibits some of the worst D&I. The open source survey run by GitHub states that only 3% of contributors to open source software are female (GitHub, 2017). While open source has made strides in some aspects of D&I, such as event inclusivity (Irwin, 2017) and community engagement to support organizational diversity (Alexander, 2019), work remains. The proposed is aimed at contributing to this positive growth through the development of a D&I badging system. In open source, badges are available for community leaders to publicly display, providing a way for projects to signal their attention to such things as community health and software security. Known examples of software badging systems in open source include the CII Best Practices Badge, Black Duck Security Risk Badge, and the PyPi Python Coverage Badge. We can draw from this badging work to improve D&I in open source. While software badges present solutions for most goals of software development, no badge has been created to support D&I initiatives, and the proposed talk aims to advance these efforts. In this talk, I will discuss complexities associated with D&I metrics and propose a D&I badging system that provides open source communities the ability to make diversity and inclusion within open source projects more transparent.


Ray Paik

Ray Paik

Community Manager - GitLab

Ray is a Community Manager at GitLab where he is helping to grow the community of contributors to GitLab. Prior to GitLab, Ray was responsible for the day-to-day operation of the Open Platform for NFV (OPNFV) community since its launch in 2014. He has over 15 years of experience in the high-tech industry in roles ranging from software engineer, product manager, program manager, account manager, and team lead at companies such as EDS, Intel, Linux Foundation, and Medallia. Ray lives in Sunnyvale, CA with his wife and daughter and all three are loyal season ticket holders of the San Jose Earthquakes soccer team.

Session: Managing community backlog with the help of metrics

One of the ways you can measure responsiveness to community contribution is by looking at the size of the backlog periodically. If the backlog of community contribution keeps growing without contributions being closed/merged in a timely manner, this will lead to dissatisfaction among community members. In this talk, Ray will discuss why “Community contribution” Merge Request (MR) backlog has become important at GitLab and how he worked with Alberto at Bitergia to develop visualizations for MR backlogs across GitLab projects. Alberto will discuss why current GrimoireLab dashboards needed to evolve to support GitLab’s use case (beyond GrimoireLab’s existing backlog focused dashboards), technical challenges and limitations when developing the visualization (e.g. calculating the number of contributions that were in opened state on the fly within a given time range that can be selected by the user), and plans for upstreaming this work to CHAOSS.


Remy DeCausemaker

Remy DeCausemaker

Remy DeCausemaker is an open source advocate and community manager. He has lead community development around a number of open source projects and efforts including Fedora Linux, Hillary Clinton’s Presidential Campaign, and most recently as the head of open source at Twitter. Remy was also an Adjunct Professor at RIT where he helped formulate the school’s first interdisciplinary minor in free and open source software and free culture. @Remy_D

Session: Heat, Light, and Love: Telling Twitter's Open Source Program Office's Story

Making it simple to trust, ship, and grow open source at Twitter demanded visibility into contribution trends that were not readily available. Twitter's open source program office and the Augur project collaborated with CHAOSS using student interns from Google's Summer of Code, Twitter's intern program and the University of Missouri. First, this talk will describe Twitter's engaging interface design and its fit to the needs of Open Source stakeholders within Twitter, but outside the open source program office. Second, we will describe how an open API and data collection tool, Augur, evolved in close collaboration with Twitter.


Sean Goggins

Sean Goggins

Associate Professor - University of Missouri

Sean is an open source software researcher and a founding member of the Linux Foundation’s working group on community health analytics for open source software CHAOSS, co-lead of the CHAOSS metrics software working group and leader of the open source metrics tool AUGUR which can be forked and cloned and experimented wtih on GitHub. After a decade as a software engineer, Sean decided his calling was in research. His open source research is framed around a broader agenda of social computing research, which he pursues as an associate professor of computer science at the University of Missouri.

Sean is also the founder of the Data Science and Analytics Masters program at Missouri, which he’s now passed on to people who want administrative empire. Sean’s publications focus on understanding how social technologies influence organizational, small group and community dynamics, typically including analysis of electronic trace data from systems combined with the perspectives of people whose behavior is traced. He lives in Columbia, MO with his wife Kate, two daughters and a dog named Huckleberry. @sociallycompute

Session: Heat, Light, and Love: Telling Twitter's Open Source Program Office's Story

Making it simple to trust, ship, and grow open source at Twitter demanded visibility into contribution trends that were not readily available. Twitter's open source program office and the Augur project collaborated with CHAOSS using student interns from Google's Summer of Code, Twitter's intern program and the University of Missouri. First, this talk will describe Twitter's engaging interface design and its fit to the needs of Open Source stakeholders within Twitter, but outside the open source program office. Second, we will describe how an open API and data collection tool, Augur, evolved in close collaboration with Twitter.


Sharan Foga

Sharan Foga

VP Apache Community Development - The Apache Software Foundation

Sharan Foga has over 20 years in the IT industry working on the delivery and implementation of IT projects. She is currently based in Stockholm, Sweden and works for Sandvik as an Agile Delivery Manager. She has been involved with the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) since 2008 and has presented at several conferences about ""The Apache Way"" of engaging and empowering communities. She enjoys working on open source community management and is VP Apache Community Development. She is a Committer, ASF Member and is involved in several ASF projects including Apache Community Development, Apache OFBiz, Apache Kibble, Apache Training (incubating) and Apache Incubator.

Session: Measuring Culture

They say you can’t be certain of anything unless it can be measured – so what about culture? We know it exists and can be passed on to others, so there must be a way to measure it. Using Apache Kibble we attempt to look for cultural indicators at the Apache Software Foundation, set a cultural benchmark then match real Apache projects against it. In theory we would expect a perfect match but as the results show, culture isn’t that simple.


Tom Mens

Tom Mens

Professor in Software Engineering - University of Mons, Belgium

Tom Mens obtained his PhD in Science at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium) in 1999. He became a lecturer at the University of Mons in October 2003, where he is currently full professor, directing the Software Engineering Lab. His main research interest is empirical software engineering with a specific focus on the evolution, quality and health management of software ecosystems. He co-organised the ICSE 2018 and 2019 Software Health (SoHeal) workshops, and was project leader of the FNRS-FRQ Québec-Wallonie collaborative research project “Socio-Technical Methodology and Analysis of Software Ecosystem Health” (https://secohealth.github.io). He is project coordinator of the ongoing Belgian FNRS-FWO Excellence of Science project “Automated Assistance for Developing Software in Ecosystems of the Future” (https://secoassist.github.io). He co-edited two Springer books “Software Evolution” and “Evolving Software Systems” and has published numerous highly-cited scientific articles in international software engineering conferences and journals. For more information visit https://staff.umons.ac.be/tom.mens @tom_mens

Session: Technical Lag: Measuring the outdatedness, vulnerability and bugginess of software

This talk presents a generic and empirically validated measurement framework based on the technical lag concept. The framework can be used to assess and reduce the outdatedness, vulnerability and bugginess of software deployments, software projects, software containers and reusable software libraries. We argue that such a metric is very relevant for assessing the health of software (eco)systems, and should become part of the CHAOSS metrics portfolio and tooling. The concept of technical lag aims to quantify to which extent a deployed collection of components is outdated with respect to an ideal deployment. How to interpret this ""ideal"" and the ""outdatedness"" w.r.t. this ""ideal"" is highly context-specific. Depending on the needs and goals of a specific project or a maintainer, the focus may be on functionality, security, stability or even other factors. The ""components"" under consideration could be individual software packages, third-party libraries, component dependencies, or software containers bundling collections of components. To cover this high variability, we have come up with a generic framework for technical lag. We have operationalised and empirically validated this framework in different contexts: to assess the technical lag incurred by outdated dependencies in reusable package repositories such as npm; and to quantify the outdatedness of Debian-based Docker containers in terms of missing updates, vulnerabilities and bugs. We also report on the qualitative evaluation of the usefulness of measuring technical lag, through online surveys conducted with open source software developers. Finally, we present Conpan, an open source tool that we have developed for analysing technical lag in Docker containers. Useful references about technical lag are available on https://secoassist.github.io/results.html


Yo Yehudi

Yo Yehudi

Software Developer and EngD candidate - University of Cambridge and University of Manchester

Yo is a Software Sustainability Institute Fellow, founder of Code is Science (www.codeisscience.com/manifesto), EngD student at the University of Manchester studying the effects of community and usability on open source software, editor for the PLOS Open Source Toolkit (channels.plos.org/open-source-toolkit), board member of the Open Bioinformatics Foundation (www.open-bio.org/board/), and a software developer at the University of Cambridge, working on an open source biological data warehouse called InterMine (intermine.org). @yoyehudi

Session: Open and Reproducible Research with Community-driven Research Software Metrics

What do artificial neural networks, images of the black hole, and SETI@home all have in common? They all trace their roots to research software. In this session, we hope to explore metrics and best practices for evaluating open research software. Research software engineers are evaluated largely based on the numbers of publications and citations. However, metrics based on the number of publications encourage re-creating ‘new’ things or reimplementations instead of reuse, and there are huge variations in existing practices to cite software, meaning software isn't always cited or citations aren’t always captured. Better metrics that reflect the health of research software is crucial to avoid gamification, incentivising research software engineers to follow best software development practices by recognising and rewarding their effort appropriately, and ultimately advancing open science and improving the reproducibility of research.

Through engaging the audience in a discussion to compare research software and other FOSS, we hope to better connect the research software community to the wider FOSS community. By learning from each other, we aim to identify evaluation metrics that accurately reflect research software health and can be used by hiring committees and research funders, to encourage them to move away from current problematic metrics. Ultimately, we hope this will incentivise the creation and maintenance of good quality scientific open software.

Sponsors

This is a community organized event, and we rely on sponsors to cover costs for coffee and other refreshments. If you are interested in sponsoring, please have a look at our sponsor_prospectus. Thank you to our current sponsors!

Silver Sponsors

CHAOSScon EU 2020 Organizing Committee

  • Ahmed Zerouali
  • Daniel Izquierdo
  • Dawn Foster
  • Georg Link
  • Kevin Lumbard
  • Matt Germonprez
  • Ray Paik
  • Sean Goggins

Upcoming CHAOSScon events

Past CHAOSScon events

Copyright © 2019 CHAOSS a Linux Foundation® project. All rights reserved. The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our Trademark Usage page. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.