CHAOSScon North America 2019

San Diego, California

Tuesday, August 20th

About CHAOSScon

Learn about open source project health metrics and tools used by open source projects, communities, and engineering teams to track and analyze their community work. This conference will provide a venue for discussing open source project health, CHAOSS updates, use cases, and hands-on workshops for developers, community managers, project managers, and anyone interested in measuring open source project health. We will also share insights from the CHAOSS working groups on Diversity and Inclusion, Evolution, Risk, Value, and Common Metrics.

Where?

Hilton San Diego Bayfront
1 Park Boulevard
San Diego, California 92101

Co-located with Open Source Summit North America 2019

When?

Tuesday, August 20, 2019
9am - 6pm

Organizing Committee

Ray Paik
Sarah Conway
Georg Link
Daniel Izquierdo
Sean Goggins
Matt Germonprez
Dawn Foster
Vinod Ahuja
Kevin Lumbard

Schedule: August 20, 2019

Time / Room Sessions
8:00 - 9:00 Registration & Networking
9:00 - 9:15
Sapphire H
Welcome and Overview
9:15 - 9:45
Sapphire H
Keynote: Zaheda Bhorat: Strategy and Data for Open Source Growth
9:45 - 10:15 Break - Coffee and Snacks Provided Thanks to Our Sponsors
10:15 - 11:30
Sapphire L
Dawn Foster, Nicole Huesman, and Georg Link: Diversity & Inclusion WG Tutorial
10:15 - 11:30
Sapphire H
Brian Proffitt: Open Sourcing for a Living: Determining Organizational Affiliations
Sean Goggins: Augur Update: Value, Risk and Integrated Data
Armstrong Foundjem: The On-boarding Experience and Software Ecosystem Health
11:30 - 12:00
Sapphire H
Lightning Talks, 5 min each (sign-up on site)
12:00 - 1:30
off-site
Lunch (on your own)
1:30 - 2:00
Sapphire H
Keynote: Jana Gallus: Motivation and Incentives: An Evidence-Based Approach To Community Management
2:00 - 3:15
Sapphire L
J. Manrique López and Santiago Dueñas: Dive into GrimoireLab
2:00 - 3:15
Sapphire H
Harish Pillay: Morality and Ethics in Software: Can it be measured?
Matt Snell: Implementing CII Best Practice Metrics & What it Really Means
Andy Leak: Chaoss Value Metrics Group
3:15 - 3:45 Break - Coffee and Snacks Provided Thanks to Our Sponsors
3:45 - 5:00
Sapphire L
Sean Goggins: Augur Workshop
3:45 - 5:00
Sapphire H
Valerio Cosentino and Georg Link: Two different philosophies on measuring open source project health: Comparing GrimoireLab and CROSSMINER
Alison Yu: Jumpstarting an OSPO and How to Measure Internal Community Success
Ray Paik: What do all these metrics tell us about our communities?
5:00
Sapphire H
closing remarks

Speakers and Session Descriptions

Alison Yu

Alison Yu

Open Source Community Manager - Indeed.com

Alison is the Open Source Community Manager at Indeed. Prior to joining Indeed, Alison led the global social media efforts at Cloudera, Informatica, and SunPower. She built the Cloudera and Informatica social media programs from the ground up, scaling globally, and spoke at Dreamforce and SXSW. Alison also was part of the Corporate Communications team that led Cloudera through IPO. Additionally, at Cloudera, Alison helped lead Cloudera Cares, Cloudera's philanthropic arm. Under Alison's management, Cloudera Cares evolved from a grassroots volunteer movement to an organized initiative that develops meaningful partnerships with non-profits. In her role with Cloudera Cares, Alison developed partnerships with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC), DataKind, Thorn, Bay Area Discovery Museum, and more. Alison holds a B.A. in Communication from the University of California, Davis. @alisonjudy

Session: Jumpstarting an OSPO and How to Measure Internal Community Success

Getting buy-in for an Open Source Program Office (OSPO) can be tough. For a successful program, you need almost the entire company to buy-in, from executives to your marketing team to your engineering teams to your recruitment teams. And once you get that buy-in? Be prepared to measure and prove your success. In this talk, I'll go over how we got executive and marketing buy-in, and the different initiatives that are targeted to our internal audience. I'll also answer the mighty question: What metrics should we be tracking? You may be asking yourself, how do I get a sense of the community’s activity and growth? I'll go over the data that we collect as a team, and how we use that data to: show our success, update our community strategy, point out weaknesses, and eliminate obstacles as they arise. Disclaimer: No two communities are the same – but if they were, that wouldn’t be as fun.


Andy Leak

Andy Leak

Software Developer - Mountain View Smart Contracts

Long experience in software development and business operations. Current projects include a market system for independent contractors (Bugmark) and a communications system for first responders (Org2). @akleak

Session: Chaoss Value Metrics Group

The CHAOSS Value Metrics Group started in Spring 2019. In this talk, we will describe the Value Metrics and how they relate to Open Source Program Offices. We will describe new software tools for measuring Economic Value, present the results of an email survey, and describe lessons learned in a series of interviews with Open Source Program Offices. We'll discuss next steps, and potential efforts to build connections between OSPO offices for networking and learning.


Armstrong Foundjem

Armstrong Foundjem

PhD Cand. / DevOps - Polytechnique Montreal

Ph.D. Candidate., Software Engineering, MCIS -- Laboratory, École Polytechnique de Montréal. OpenStack Member Level: Foundation Member. I am focused on empirical research on ecosystems software releases. I apply mixed method research as a means to answer both the how and why in my findings, which is beneficiary to both the academic and industrial communities. I am Using a DevOps approach with machine learning to make crucial decisions. Currently, I am involved with the release team of OpenStack and serving as the PC chair of AI and HPC track, for the submit at Denver 2019. Additionally, I am a Big Data analytics guy. Before my current experience, I had Worked on interesting software engineering topics for swarms of robots. Moreover, my expertise in cloud computing is an asset, which I bring along. In my thesis, I investigated the phenomena of live migrations and how we can apply both the supervised and reinforced learning technique (Machine learning algorithms) on live migration in the cloud.
I was part of the team; team lead on an exciting project at LASSENA Laboratory Montreal, Canada. My main task includes building test bench simulator for micro iBB black boxes for cars in other to reconstruct accident scenario to understand driver's behavior. Currently, I am serving as a Science Judge for Quebec and Canada (Canada-Wide-Science) Member of IEEE and ACM. @foundjem

Session: How to release an open source Ecosystems?

Software ecosystems bring value by integrating projects related to a given domain, for example, open source projects in a Linux distribution or mobile apps in the Android platform. Since each project has its release cycle and roadmap, having to install compatible versions of each project manually puts an enormous burden on the users, and hence many ecosystems release a polished, well-integrated product to the end user. This paper empirically studies this release synchronization strategy in the context of the OpenStack ecosystem, in which a central release management team manages the six-month release cycle of the overall OpenStack product. By analyzing one year of release team IRC meeting logs, we identified nine major release synchronization activities, which we cataloged and documented. To validate our findings, we interviewed 8 active OpenStack practitioners (members of either the release team or project teams). Our results suggest that even though an ecosystem’s power lies in the interaction of independent projects, release synchronization is a non-trivial goal.


Brian Proffitt

Brian Proffitt

Sr. Principal Community Architect - Red Hat

Brian is a Senior Principal Community Architect for the Red Hat Open Source Program Office, responsible for community content, onboarding, and open source consulting. Brian also serves on the governing board for Project CHAOSS, a metrics-oriented approach to ascertaining community health. @TheTechScribe

Session: Open Sourcing for a Living: Determining Organizational Affiliations

The time for convincing organizations to participate in open source has long passed. No longer do projects have to encourage organizations to work with communities… now it has become a challenge trying to learn how much these organizations are involved! In this talk, Brian Proffitt will examine how Project CHAOSS is working to determine organizational influence, relationships, and diversity, and why these aspects of community health are key to a project’s well being!


Dawn Foster

Dawn Foster

Open Source Software Strategy Lead - Pivotal

Dawn works on OSS Strategy at Pivotal in London. She has more than 20 years of experience at companies like The Scale Factory, Puppet Labs, Intel, Jive Software, and others. She has expertise in community building, open source software, metrics, and more. She is passionate about bringing people together through a combination of online communities and real-world events along with analyzing the data associated with participation in developer and open source communities. Dawn is on the Governing Board of the Linux Foundation’s CHAOSS project and is a maintainer for the Diversity and Inclusion WG. She holds a PhD from the University of Greenwich along with an MBA and BS in Computer Science. She has spoken at dozens of industry events, including many Linux Foundation events, OSCON, SXSW, FOSDEM and more.

Session: Diversity & Inclusion WG Tutorial

While it is recognized that diversity and inclusion are central to the health of open source communities, numbers lag and the ability to foster inclusive environments remains challenging. The CHAOSS Project’s Diversity & Inclusion Working group is focused on establishing a set of community-curated, peer-validated, research-informed standards and best practices to measure, and in turn, increase, diversity and inclusion across open source communities. In this interactive tutorial, you will contribute to this work by breaking into groups to define several diversity and inclusion metrics. Let’s work together to make our collective open source communities more welcoming, broader and heterogeneous.


Georg Link

Georg Link

Director of Sales - Bitergia

Georg Link is an Open Source Community Strategist. Georg co-founded the Linux Foundation CHAOSS Project to advance analytics and metrics for open source project health. Georg has 13 years experience as an active contributor to several open source projects and has presented on open source topics at 18 conferences. Georg has an MBA and a Ph.D. in Information Technology. In his spare time, Georg enjoys reading fiction and hot-air ballooning. @GeorgLink

Session: Diversity & Inclusion WG Tutorial

While it is recognized that diversity and inclusion are central to the health of open source communities, numbers lag and the ability to foster inclusive environments remains challenging. The CHAOSS Project’s Diversity & Inclusion Working group is focused on establishing a set of community-curated, peer-validated, research-informed standards and best practices to measure, and in turn, increase, diversity and inclusion across open source communities. In this interactive tutorial, you will contribute to this work by breaking into groups to define several diversity and inclusion metrics. Let’s work together to make our collective open source communities more welcoming, broader and heterogeneous.

Session: Two different philosophies on measuring open source project health: Comparing GrimoireLab and CROSSMINER

Decision makers often face challenges to understand open source projects, especially as data is scattered across different collaboration platforms. Two tools - GrimoireLab and CROSSMINER - were developed to overcome this challenge but were started with different goals in mind. On the one hand, GrimoireLab focused on understanding software development process within open source projects. On the other hand, CROSSMINER focused on helping software developers select the right open source projects. The meaning of project health is different in both cases. This talk is about this philosophical difference in approaching open source project health metrics, how it shaped the tools, what this means for metrics that were implemented, and what lessons can be learned about measuring open source project health.


Harish Pillay

Harish Pillay

Head, Community Architecture and Leadership - Red Hat

Please see LinkedIn for information about Harish: http://linkedin.com/in/harishpillay @harishpillay

Session: Morality and Ethics in Software: Can it be measured?

Software drives everything. What drives software is algorithms. We have been able to measure how "good" or "bad" a piece of software is by various metrics as done by the Prospector project. Is there a higher level of consideration around the the ethical basis of software and contrasting that with the morality of software and algorithms. How should developers be driven when it comes to crafting ethical solutions if the morality of the developer is challenged and vice versa? Is there an absolute moral code for developers? Ethical codes are crafted in many professions but there aren't moral codes. Is that an oversight. This talk will explore the nuances of ethics and morals and propose some mental strategies in navigating these. It is not meant to be exhaustive nor definitive. There does not seem to be much by way of research in this field and one of the outcomes of this talk is to trigger the discussion and potentially finding a way to quantify, measure and perhaps act on being ethical and moral in software development.


Jana Gallus

Jana Gallus

Assistant Professor - UCLA

Jana Gallus is an Assistant Professor of Strategy and Behavioral Decision Making at UCLA's Anderson School of Management. Her research interests lie in behavioral economics, innovation and strategy, with a focus on non-financial incentives and their effects on motivation and performance. She runs field experiments testing the effects of award schemes and other non-financial incentives for innovation with organizations and crowd-based communities including, among others, Wikipedia, NASA, and international code collaboration platforms. Jana's work has been published or is forthcoming in Management Science, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Strategic Management Journal, Labour Economics, and Applied Economics, among other journals. She is the coauthor of Honours versus Money: The Economics of Awards, Oxford University Press. Her research is informed by consulting activities for organizations on the design of incentives and recognition schemes. Jana joined UCLA from Harvard, where she was a post-doctoral Fellow. She received her PhD in Economics from the University of Zurich, with the distinction summa cum laude, and holds two Master's degrees, from Sciences Po Paris in France and the University of St. Gallen in Switzerland. After joining UCLA Jana was appointed a Fellow in the Crowd Innovation Lab at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University. She is also a Fellow at the Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts, Switzerland, and an elected member of the European Academy of Sciences and Arts. @janagallus

Session: Keynote

Motivation and Incentives: An Evidence-Based Approach To Community Management


J. Manrique Lopez

J. Manrique Lopez

CEO - Bitergia

Manrique is the CEO and shareholder in Bitergia and a free, libre, open source software development communities passionate. He is a graduated Industrial Engineer with research and development experience from the Technological Center for Computer Science and Communications of the Principality of Asturias (CTIC), W3C working groups, Ándago Engineering, and Continua Health Alliance. Former executive director of the Spanish Open Source Enterprises Association (ASOLIF), and expert consultant for the Spanish National Open Source Reference Center (CENATIC). Involved in several communities related to free, libre, open source software he is currently active in GrimoireLab and CHAOSS. You can reach him on Twitter as @jsmanrique, and while he is not online he loves to spend time with his family and to surf. @jsmanrique

Session: Dive into GrimoireLab

GrimoireLab is one of the CHAOSS projects, and it is basically a toolkit to automatic and incremental data gathering from almost any tool (data source) related with contributing to Open Source development, data enrichment, by merging duplicated identities, adding additional information about contributors affiliation, calculation delays or geographical data, and data visualization, allowing filtering by time range, project, repository, contributor, etc. During this workshop, attendees shall learn more about how each GrimoireLab component work, and finally, how to get CHAOSS metrics through the toolkit, or even their own custom metrics for their very specific needs.


Matt Snell

Matt Snell

Student-Developer - University of Nebraska at Omaha

Matt is a undergraduate student at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Working with Dr. Matt Germonprez, he was part of the team that developed the Global Consent Manager. He presented this work at Mozfest 2018. His current focus is on implementing risk metrics for Augur and enhancing newcomer experience. @msnell

Session: Implementing CII Best Practice Metrics & What it Really Means

This presentation is to explain the process of implementing the CII Best Practices API as a risk metric and a brief discussion of its implications. I will start with a program that performs a basic API call to CII. Next, I will examine the API call and explain some important parameters. Then, I will ask for some feedback on other parameters that may be useful. A combination of the predetermined metrics and audience suggestions will be used to create a CII dashboard. If we are short on time, example code will be ready to be used in the place of written code. I will end the presentation with a brief discussion with the audience, exploring potential use cases and implications of the CII Best Practices metric.


Nicole Huesman

Session: Diversity & Inclusion WG Tutorial

While it is recognized that diversity and inclusion are central to the health of open source communities, numbers lag and the ability to foster inclusive environments remains challenging. The CHAOSS Project’s Diversity & Inclusion Working group is focused on establishing a set of community-curated, peer-validated, research-informed standards and best practices to measure, and in turn, increase, diversity and inclusion across open source communities. In this interactive tutorial, you will contribute to this work by breaking into groups to define several diversity and inclusion metrics. Let’s work together to make our collective open source communities more welcoming, broader and heterogeneous.


Ray Paik

Ray Paik

Community Manager - GitLab

Ray is a Community Manager at GitLab where he is helping to grow the community of contributors to GitLab. Prior to GitLab, Ray was responsible for the day-to-day operation of the Open Platform for NFV (OPNFV) community since its launch in 2014. He has over 15 years of experience in the high-tech industry in roles ranging from software engineer, product manager, program manager, account manager, and team lead at companies such as EDS, Intel, Linux Foundation, and Medallia. Ray lives in Sunnyvale, CA with his wife and daughter and all three are loyal season ticket holders of the San Jose Earthquakes soccer team. @rspaik

Session: What do all these metrics tell us about our communities?

There are plenty of metrics available to measure various aspects of your community ranging from contributors, contributors’ activities, followers on social media, event attendees, etc. However, what exactly are these metrics telling us and do they always tell the same story? Metrics (and numbers in general) can give people a false sense of clarity and even worse, people can draw wrong conclusions from metrics when they lack proper context. So how and when should metrics be used? In this session, Ray will discuss how metrics are used at GitLab to assess support for community members across different phases of the contributor journey. Ray will also discuss how community metrics at GitLab has evolved over time and how it needs to continue to evolve as the GitLab community grows.


Santiago Dueñas

Santiago Duenas

CTO - Bitergia

Santiago Dueñas is an open source advocate and a CTO at Bitergia. He is part of CHAOSS community and currently leads the development of GrimoireLab platform. Before joining Bitergia, Santiago was part of LibreSoft, a research team at Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, where he studied different facets of libre software such as development processes, coordination and involvement in open source projects and their communities. @sduenasd

Session: Dive into GrimoireLab

GrimoireLab is one of the CHAOSS projects, and it is basically a toolkit to automatic and incremental data gathering from almost any tool (data source) related with contributing to Open Source development, data enrichment, by merging duplicated identities, adding additional information about contributors affiliation, calculation delays or geographical data, and data visualization, allowing filtering by time range, project, repository, contributor, etc. During this workshop, attendees shall learn more about how each GrimoireLab component work, and finally, how to get CHAOSS metrics through the toolkit, or even their own custom metrics for their very specific needs.


Sean Goggins

Sean Goggins

Augur Lead, CHAOSS Member, Associate Professor - University of Missouri

Sean is an open source software researcher and a founding member of the Linux Foundations working group on community health analytics for open source software CHAOSS, co-lead of the CHAOSS metrics software working group and leader of the open source metrics tool AUGUR which can be forked and cloned and experimented wtih on GitHub. After a decade as a software engineer, Sean decided his calling was in research. His open source research is framed around a broader agenda of social computing research, which he pursues as an associate professor of computer science at the University of Missouri. @sociallycompute

Session: Augur Update: Value, Risk and Integrated Data

Risk and Value metrics are initiating a process of aggregating CHAOSS metrics into new forms. Augur's integrated git, Issue tracker and code evaluation tools to address these needs in a new, consolidated data model, supported by GSoC students and ongoing development. This presentation will review Augur in the context of Risk and Value metric implementations.

Session: Augur Workshop

Get your feet wet with Augur. Learn the basics to get started.


Valerio Cosentino

Valerio Cosentino

Senior Software Developer - Bitergia

I'm a software engineer at Bitergia (http://bitergia.com) since September 2017. I got my MSc. in computer science in 2010 and Ph.D. in computer science in 2013. My interests cover source code analysis, (software) data extraction and reverse engineering.

Before joining Bitergia, I have been a Phd student at IBM France and postdoctoral fellow in a couple of research teams between France and Spain, where I worked on reverse engineering of legacy systems (e.g., COBOL), analysis of (OSS) projects (e.g., code complexity, bus factor) and open data (e.g., scientific literature). @valcos

Session: Two different philosophies on measuring open source project health: Comparing GrimoireLab and CROSSMINER

Decision makers often face challenges to understand open source projects, especially as data is scattered across different collaboration platforms. Two tools - GrimoireLab and CROSSMINER - were developed to overcome this challenge but were started with different goals in mind. On the one hand, GrimoireLab focused on understanding software development process within open source projects. On the other hand, CROSSMINER focused on helping software developers select the right open source projects. The meaning of project health is different in both cases. This talk is about this philosophical difference in approaching open source project health metrics, how it shaped the tools, what this means for metrics that were implemented, and what lessons can be learned about measuring open source project health.


Zaheda Bhorat

Zaheda Bhorat

Head of Open Source Strategy - Amazon Web Services Zaheda Bhorat is the head of open source strategy at AWS. A computer scientist, Zaheda is a longtime active contributor to open source and open standards communities. Previously, she shaped the first-ever open source program office at Google; launched successful programs, including Google Summer of Code; and represented Google on many industry standards executive boards across multiple technologies. She also served as a senior technology advisor for the Office of the CTO at the UK Government Digital Service, where she co-led the open standards policy, which is in use by the UK government on open document formats. Zaheda was responsible for OpenOffice.org, and later NetBeans.org, at Sun Microsystems, where she built a thriving global volunteer community and delivered the first user version, OpenOffice 1.0. Zaheda is passionate about technology, education, open source, and the positive impact of collaboration for social good. She serves on the UK government’s Open Standards Board, which determines the standards government should adopt. She also serves on the board of directors of the Mifos Initiative, an open source effort that is positioning financial institutions to become digitally connected providers of financial services to the poor. Zaheda speaks internationally on topics related to open source and social good.

Session: Keynote: Strategy and Data for Open Source Growth

Data is key to informing a strategy. Over the last twenty years, open source projects have collected data to track and measure project and community growth. As more enterprise developers have engaged in open source, companies have used this data to support different business models. How has the data and tools evolved, and what are successful projects, communities and companies measuring to inform strategies.

Sponsors

This is a community organized event, and we rely on sponsors to cover costs for coffee and other refreshments. If you are interested in sponsoring, please have a look at our sponsor_prospectus. Thank you to our current sponsors!

 

Gold Level Sponsors

Silver Level Sponsors

Bitergia

Upcoming CHAOSScon events

  • CHAOSScon 2019 North America, August 20th, 2019, San Diego, California, co-located with Open Source Summit 2019.
  • CHAOSScon 2020 Europe, TBA, Brussels, Belgium, co-located with FOSDEM 2020.

Past CHAOSScon events

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